CONFERENCE 2017

 

BCHPCA Invites You to CONFERENCE 2017

EXTENDING THE CIRCLE OF COMPASSION

Bringing together hospice staff and volunteers, community and faith organizations, researchers, schools, healthcare professionals and others from the broader community – to learn about innovative programs, examples of compassionate communities and new opportunities for the entire hospice palliative care community – as we extend the circle of compassion around each patient and their family throughout British Columbia.

Building on the themes from FORUM 2014 and CONFERENCES 2015 and 2016, BCHPCA will be offering a number of plenary and breakout sessions on Friday May 26th and Saturday, May 27th, 2017 at the Radisson Vancouver Airport Hotel, conveniently located in Richmond, near the Vancouver International Airport, the South Terminal and the Aberdeen Station of the Canada Line.

BCHPCA annual Awards luncheon is scheduled for Friday and the BCHPCA Annual General Meeting will be held at lunch on Saturday. This year, BCHPCA has partnered with the BC Centre for Palliative Care (BC-CPC) to offer a stream of breakout sessions specifically for health care professionals. There is also an opportunity for Hospice Society personnel to meet together during the Regional Meetings held on Friday afternoon and for clinicians to debrief with their colleagues.  

Your CONFERENCE 2017 registration includes: all plenary sessions and your choices of the concurrent breakout sessions, Friday and Saturday breakfast and lunch and all refreshment breaks. 2017 registrations fees:
 

BCHPCA Members 2 day registration $325.00
BCHPCA Members 1 day registration $180.00
Non BCHPCA Members 2 day registration $420.00
Non BCHPCA Members 1 day registration $225.00
Full time students/Volunteers 2 day registration $300.00
Full time students/Volunteers 1 day registration $165.00

COME EXPERIENCE THE ‘PEAK OF VANCOUVER’

Skyride above the CityOn Friday evening, we hope that you will join us for dinner in the Timber Room on the top of Grouse Mountain, the ‘Peak of Vancouver’. “Grouse Mountain is Vancouver’s premier four season attraction. Panoramic views of the city, ocean and mountain unfold as the Skyride, North America’s largest aerial tram system, whisks visitors to the mountaintop, 3,700’ above the city. Situated only 15 minutes from downtown Vancouver, Grouse Mountain is truly a marriage of wilderness and civilization.” Ticket purchase for our ‘Peak of Vancouver’ dinner event includes the charter bus trip from the Radisson Hotel to the base of Grouse Mountain where we will travel on the Skyride aerial tram – twelve minutes to the mountaintop, dinner with a cash bar and the return trip. The timing should allow for amazing city, mountain and ocean views on the trip up and a sparkling panorama of city lights on the trip down; expected return to hotel is approximately 10:30PM. Casual dress is recommended. There are a limited number of tickets for our Peak of Vancouver dinner event; please purchase your tickets early.

Hotel Accomodations

BCHPCA has negotiated a very favourable conference room rate ($135/night) with the Radisson Vancouver Airport Hotel – to take advantage of this preferred rate, please book your rooms before April 21st, 2017Note: Please note that late registrants for last year’s conference found the Radisson to be “sold-out” and had to find alternate and much more expensive accommodations elsewhere.

Hotel Registration Page

 

Program at a Glance

Click to view the Conference 2017 Program at a Glance

Friday & Saturday Session Details

Click on the bars below to view complete details about Conference 2017 sessions and speakers.

Plenary Sessions - Friday & Saturday (Click to view)

PLENARY SESSIONS

  • Friday May 26th – 0900 - 1000
  • Care For Our Care Partners.

True care and compassion form the foundation for the provision of Hospice Palliative Care. As we are called to extend this circle of compassion into our communities, Michelle will explore how we can be leaders in encouraging our colleagues and partners to remain healthy and foster their own sense of wellness for their members.
Michelle O’Rourke, RN MA

  • Friday May 26th – 1015 - 1100
  • A Palliative Approach to Care: What Does That Really Mean?

Drawing on an extensive clinical background and iPANEL findings, this plenary explores the changing landscape of end of life care, in particular, practices that have diminished a palliative orientation in care outside of specialist palliative care; proposes components of a palliative approach; and highlights opportunities to improve experiences through adopting, adapting and integrating a palliative approach into usual care. Participants will be inspired to consider how they too can support a shift to a palliative approach.
Della Roberts, RN MSN CHPCN(C) 

  • Friday May 26th – 1330 - 1415
  • What Matters Most: Building Capacity for Person-Centered Care.

This session will highlight the work of the BC Centre for Palliative Care within the current national and provincial landscape to promote uptake of a palliative approach to care as well as enhance Advance Care Planning, Serious Illness and Compassionate Community initiatives.
Dr. Doris Barwich, MD, CCFP

  • Saturday May 27th – 0845 - 0945
  • Medically- Assisted Death and Voluntary Euthanasia: Unique Grieving Factors and the Potential for Complicated Grief.

Medically-assisted death and voluntary euthanasia are relatively “new” ways to die. This has specific outcomes for grievers. Dr. Srinivasan will review literature related to the grief responses that are unique to medically-assisted deaths. She will also share her research findings on bereavement experiences following an assisted death in Oregon, focusing on factors that may potentially lead to complicated grief. Implications for providing support to those who are grieving a death under Canada’s Medical Assistance in Dying law will be discussed, as well as directions for future research.
Dr. Erica Srinivasan, PhD, BA 

  •  Saturday May 27th 1330 - 1430
  • PANEL: Honouring the End of Life: Faith Traditions Share Their Stories

Facilitator, Pastor Chris Yue
Panelists include: Rev. Doug Longstaffe, Dr. Parin Dossa, Jagbir Kaur, RN MN Additional panelists TBC

  • Saturday May 27th – 1500 - 1530
  • Jim Speaks – A Take Home Message From a Patient, Caregiver and Advocate.

Jim Mulcahy recently opened the Palliative Care Matters| National Consensus Building Conference in Ottawa with this heartfelt presentation to the entire Canadian hospice palliative care community.  His message is made possible to BCHPCA’s conference attendees by permission from the Palliative Care Institute, Covenant Health and Mr. Mulcahy.

Concurrent Sessions - Friday & Saturday (Click to view)

Sessions A and B - are open to anyone wishing to attend, and include sessions related to Extending the Circle of Compassion / Compassionate Communities / Volunteer Opportunities / Advance Care Planning / New Initiatives, etc.

Sessions C
– are open to anyone wishing to attend, and include sessions related to Leadership / Management / Administration / Continuing Education / Compliance.

Sessions D – this stream of presentations and workshops is for clinicians of all disciplines. The intent is to provide context relevant to professionals working in all settings, with varying experience with palliative care. We will explore ways to incorporate palliative principles from time of diagnosis to end of life; using a palliative approach for people with all life limiting illnesses, using the examples of dementia, cardiac and renal disease. As well, clinicians will have the opportunity to practice using the Serious Illness Conversation Guide developed by Ariadne Labs out of Harvard University. The BC Centre for Palliative Care will share new resources for clinicians, educators and operational leaders.

CME Credits  - Goals of Care in Serious Illness Conversations – Tips and Tools for the Busy Health Care Professionals. Accredited by UBC-CPD 1.5 MOC Section 1 and 1.5 Mainpro+ study credits.

 

Friday Sessions Title
1A
1115
1200
Earlier, More, Better Conversation – An Introduction to the Serious Illness Conversation Guide.
To facilitate earlier, more and better conversations for seriously ill patients in British Columbia, the BC-Centre for Palliative Care (BC-CPC) has adopted the work of the Serious Illness Care (SIC) Program of Ariadne Labs at Harvard Medical School. Early conversations matter and have been associated with better outcomes for patients and families in the face of a serious life limiting illness.
Elizabeth Beddard-Huber, RN MSN, CHPCN(C)
1B
1115
1200
SOARing with Hospice Societies for Compassionate Care.
The Seed Grant program, under the BC Center for Palliative Care and in partnership with the BCHPCA, empowers community organizations to initiate novel, innovative and scalable projects to enhance public awareness about advance care planning and palliative care, and enables better access to compassionate care closer to home for British Columbians living with and dying from serious illness and their families. Come and be amazed at the contributions of compassionate care that hospice societies are providing in BC communities.
Terry Webber, RN BSPN, and Hospice Society Representatives
1C
1115
1200
Digital Engagement Strategies for Nonprofits.
Hands-on training on how to use social media marketing to increase engagement, brand and cause awareness and how to use specific tactics like live streaming during your own and community events.
Alistair Henning, Chair, ArtScene Vancouver
1D
1115
1200
Palliative Care for Patients with Advanced Dementia: Dying in the Dark.
Recent years have seen a growing recognition that dementia is a progressive, fatal illnesses and that patients nearing the end-of-life receive inadequate palliative care. There are barriers to accessing palliative care for patients in the terminal phase including lack of recognition of the end stages of dementia, lack of identification of terminal symptoms, and inadequate knowledge about life extending therapies. To address these gaps, this presentation aims to help the participant to: (1) understand the natural history of dementia, (2) examine the research evidence supporting a palliative approach for advanced dementia, and (3) identify the dimensions of a gero-palliative approach.
Maureen Shaw, RN, MN
2A
1430
1515
The Incredible Role of Family and Friend Caregivers.
Incredible. There is no other word to capture the heart and soul of a caregivers’ journey and the significant role they play in society. This presentation will give a snapshot of the range of issues facing caregivers, paired with stories and concrete lessons learned. How do we support the growing number of people who by choice, circumstance or duty find themselves caring at end of life? Where do we draw the line of responsibility in our system? How do we prepare to care? How do we extend the circle of compassion that will surely be needed to support an aging population? Anticipate a rich interactive session with ideas for the future being captured.
Barb MacLean, MA – Executive Director of Family Caregivers of BC (FCBC)
2B
1430
1515
“A DAY to REMEMBER” Promoting Grief and Loss Awareness in High School Students.
Many students are faced with the death of a peer, family member and/or teacher by the time they reach high school, yet few programs exist to prepare students for the inevitability of death and loss in their lives. The purpose of this pilot project was to provide an opportunity for students to learn about death and grief while providing support for grieving students throughout the day via drop-in groups and individual support during the day. A variety of activities were implemented to support students to memorialize their loved ones through a memory wall, Twitter feeds and a moment of silence. Further, education was provided for teachers to address the challenges of supporting grieving students and faculty. Evaluation of the project was conducted through online surveys.
Pam Pastirik, RN, MSN, PNC(C)
2C
1430
1515
FUNDRAISING: It’s Not About the Money, part one of two.
How many of us grew-up and spoke with our family about money? Some of us still hesitate to broach the topic and that remains a key reason making an ‘ask’ can be so terrifying. During this two-part session, participants will explore the fundamentals of raising funds, clarify the board’s and non-fundraising staff’s role in the fundraising process and uncover the reasons why people donate. No matter your experience level, our time together will prompt action for next week and next year.
David Love, Principal, Lovefundraising, Vancouver, BC
PLEASE NOTE: Registrants for this session, should also register for 3C – FUNDRAISING: It’s Not About the Money, part 2 of 2.
2D
1430
1515
Palliative Care Meets Cardiology: Integrating Palliative Care in Cardiac Disease Management.
There lies a substantial care gap with the provision of palliative care in end stage heart disease. This session will recognize the need for palliative care in cardiac patients through 1) understanding the natural history of end stage heart disease 2) identifying the reasons for inadequate palliative care support in cardiac patients and 3) establishing models to help improve integrative care. Research supporting the need for such integrative care will be highlighted. Indications for cardiac medications and devices will also be briefly reviewed.
Dr. Tony Verma, MD, CCFP, FRCPC
3A
1530
1615
GENERATIONS TOGETHER: A Powerful Connection to Better Health.
With stories, video and photographs, Sharon will take you on a voyage of discovery about the power of purposefully connecting young and old. The message is hopeful. With minimum effort, negligible cost and a lot of fun, together we can make a difference that empowers the very people for whom we take responsibility. This intergenerational connecting gives personal responsibility back to the young and old, and pays huge dividends that are surprising. Bringing generations together respectfully contributes to better mental, emotional, social and physical health. It re-builds community in its most fundamental sense.
Sharon Mackenzie, MEd
3B
1530
1615
Volunteer-Facilitated ACP Workshops for the Public.
Advance care planning (ACP) is a process that supports people, and their families, in preparing to make decisions about their future health care. It involves understanding and sharing their values, beliefs and wishes regarding health care. ACP prepares them, or their substitute decision maker, for conversations with health-care providers about the treatments they receive, to help in getting the care that’s right for them. ACP interventions have traditionally been conducted by health-care providers, however non-experts or peers could facilitate many key elements. These elements include increasing awareness, provision of information about the process, encouraging readiness, and supporting conversations. Some community organisations, such as hospice societies, have developed initiatives that utilise volunteers as peer/non-expert facilitators of workshops that educate the public and support them in engaging in ACP. The BC Centre for Palliative Care (BC CPC) collaborated with these organisations to develop a training curriculum for this model of ACP workshop. Through our seed grant program, we have worked with hospice societies across the province to spread and evaluate these volunteer facilitated ACP workshops throughout British Columbia. In this session, we will aim to answer the following questions: • What happens in these workshops? • How did the volunteers find this facilitation role? • How do the hospice societies support the volunteers? • Did the workshops work? Did members of the public that attended the workshops engage in ACP?
Rachel Carter, PhD
3C
1530
1615
FUNDRAISING: It’s Not About the Money, part two of two.
How many of us grew-up and spoke with our family about money? Some of us still hesitate to broach the topic and that remains a key reason making an ‘ask’ can be so terrifying. During this two-part session, participants will explore the fundamentals of raising funds, clarify the board’s and non-fundraising staff’s role in the fundraising process and uncover the reasons why people donate. No matter your experience level, our time together will prompt action for next week and next year.
David Love, Principal, Lovefundraising, Vancouver, BC
PLEASE NOTE: Registrants for this session, should also register for 2C – FUNDRAISING: It’s Not About the Money, part 1 of 2.
3D
1530
1615
What happens at the end of “Endstage Renal Disease”?
Endstage Renal Disease (ESRD), also known as Stage 5 Chronic Kidney Disease, is increasingly prevalent, in particular in the geriatric population. By the end of this session, participants should be able to: (1) Estimate survival (median, range) with and without dialysis treatment for their patients with Endstage (Stage 5) Renal Disease (2) List 4 things that predict prognosis in ESRD (3) Identify symptoms their patients might expect in the terminal phase of both conservatively managed ESRD and those who stop/withdraw from dialysis therapy (4) Consider conservative management with shared decision making as an option for their ESRD patients.
Dr. Rachel Carson, MD, FRCPC
Saturday Sessions Title
4A
1015
1100
Home is Where the Care is: Supporting End of Life in Long Term Care.
The perceptions and expectations of long term care can be misconstrued, particularly during the elders’ and their loved ones’ end of life experience. Focusing on a home-like environment and resident-centred care and support, end of life in long term care can be intimate, responsive and heart-warming based on a background of staff and volunteer preparation through education, mentoring, policies and programs. Support systems are in place, albeit in the background. This approach has been unequivocally supported through resident, family and loved ones’ responses of verbal, non-verbal and/or written positive acknowledgement (qualitative data).
Margaret (Meg) Milner, RN, BSN, MA
4B
1015
1100
Seeking Volunteer Voices to help shape ongoing training of BC’s hospice volunteers.
The BC Centre for Palliative Care and the BC Hospice Palliative Care Association are supporting this Master’s project – which will include a provincial survey to determine the ongoing and advanced training needs of hospice volunteers throughout BC. In this presentation, Heather Maddox will share ideas and suggestions that build on what is currently in place and that align with The Volunteer Standards for Hospice Palliative Care in British Columbia (2008). There will be discussion and an opportunity to provide input from the session participants.
Heather Maddox, MSN Candidate
4C
1015
1100
Certificate Program on End of Life: SFU Continuing Studies. 
According to the Quality End-of-Life Care Coalition of Canada, the collective impact of medical advances, increased longevity, and a rapidly aging population will increase annual deaths in Canada 40% by 2026. For B.C. this means that, in less than a decade, annual deaths will increase from 32,000 to 45,000. The SFU Continuing Studies department is currently developing an interdisciplinary certificate program on end of life to be launched in 2018, designed to complement the continuum of end-of-life care in BC. This certificate program will incorporate end-of-life perspectives from the social sciences, humanities, spiritual, ethical, legal, public health, and clinical disciplines. The program will be open to anyone who wants to enhance their personal insight and confidence in the increasingly complex field of end of life care (e.g., healthcare professionals, educators, volunteers, care-givers, etc.). While the curriculum is under development, program developers are actively seeking feedback and input from all interested parties.
Margaret Easton, PhD Candidate

4D

1015
1100

THIS SESSION IS NOW FILLED

Goals of Care in Serious Illness Conversations – Tips and Tools for the Busy Health Care Professionals, part one of two.
In this two-part workshop we will provide background to and introduce the Serious Illness Conversation Guide, patient and family tools as well as recommended system change strategies, all developed and tested by Ariadne Labs-Harvard Medical School. The tools are designed to help patients prepare for the conversation, help clinicians guide the conversation and then help patients talk to their families. The workshop will focus on skills development using the guide through role play and structured feedback from experienced and newly trained facilitators. System change strategies will be discussed to encourage participants to identify how they could use the serious illness conversation guide within their clinical practice to promote goal concordant care for their patients.
Elizabeth Beddard- Huber, RN MSN, CHPCN(C) and Dr. Gillian Fyles, MD

PLEASE NOTE: Registrants for this session, should also register for 5D – Goals of Care in Serious Illness Conversations, part 2 of 2.
5A
1115
1200
Dying in Your Own Home – Key Elements for Consideration.
Many people with a palliative diagnosis would like to stay in their own homes until the very end of their life. An integrated approach to planning for a home death is essential. This presentation will focus on lessons learned and strategies implemented to support people to die at home in Vancouver including necessary conversations, legal concerns and available support. Examples from current practice will be used to help attendees gain insight into the conditions that can help better prepare clients and heir circles of support for death at home.
Catherine Andrews, BA, BSN, CHPCN(C)
5B
1115
1200
Hospice Volunteer Navigators: An early palliative, compassionate community approach to care. 
NCARE is a program in which hospice volunteers, trained in navigation, provide early palliative support to clients living in community. Based upon a successful pilot, NCARE is now being implemented and evaluated in diverse hospice contexts across Canada. Participants in this session will hear NCARE pilot findings and will have the opportunity to work with the NCARE implementation toolkit.
Dr. Barbara Pesut PhD, RN
5C
1115
1200
So the new Society Act is in place…now what?
The new Societies Act came into force on November 28, 2016. Now what? Join us in this session to learn how this new legal development affects your society and how to ensure ongoing compliance.
Bryan Millman, Associate Lawyer, Norton Rose Fulbright Canada LLP
5D
1115
1200

THIS SESSION IS NOW FILLED

Goals of Care in Serious Illness Conversations – Tips and Tools for the Busy Health Care Professionals, part two of two.
In this two-part workshop we will provide background to and introduce the Serious Illness Conversation Guide, patient and family tools as well as recommended system change strategies, all developed and tested by Ariadne Labs-Harvard Medical School. The tools are designed to help patients prepare for the conversation, help clinicians guide the conversation and then help patients talk to their families. The workshop will focus on skills development using the guide through role play and structured feedback from experienced and newly trained facilitators. System change strategies will be discussed to encourage participants to identify how they could use the serious illness conversation guide within their clinical practice to promote goal concordant care for their patients.
Elizabeth Beddard- Huber, RN MSN, CHPCN(C) and Dr. Gillian Fyles, MD

PLEASE NOTE: Registrants for this session, should also register for 4D – Goals of Care in Serious Illness Conversations, part 1 of 2.

 

Famous Quotes